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Brit Hume Goes Bonkers

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Fox News commentator Brit Hume has gone off the deep end, even by Fox News’ standards which are a pretty low bar. On the network’s Sunday show, Hume noted that Tiger Woods is a Buddhist but that he should “turn to the Christian faith” because only the Christian faith would provide him with the “forgiveness and redemption” the golf star so obviously needs.

Well, in seminary I was not exactly stellar at the pastoral care department, and I am a big fan of everyone becoming Christian. But, a person in crisis should probably not be counseled to abandon his or her own faith traditions unless the conversion was part of an organic process, not the result of advice offered on a Sunday talk show. Buddhism is not my cup of tea – I love creation and its delicacies too much – but it certainly embodies a means towards achieving forgiveness and redemption.

Feminist theologian Mary Daly dies

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Feminist theologian Mary Daly died Jan. 3. She was a radical feminist philosopher, academic, and theologian who taught at Boston College for 33 years. Daly consented to retire from Boston College in 1999, after violating university policy by refusing to allow male students in her Women's Studies classroom.

Read the full obituary here: tMary Daly, radical feminist theologian, dead at 81

Pomp to mark installation today of new Milwaukee archbishop

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The Archdiocese of Milwaukee gets a new archbishop today. LaCrosse, Wisconsin Bishop Jerome Listecki takes over from Timothy Dolan, who was installed April 15 as archbishop of New York. On the ecclesial scale, Listecki appears to the right of Dolan who was to the right of retired Milwaukee Archbishop, Rembert Weakland.

The installation, according to local reports, includes a solemn Mass by invitation only. Forty bishops and cardinals plus 200 priests are expected to participate -- plus civic and ecumenical leaders.

They get to sit up front.

On marriage

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Elizabeth Gilbert, guru to millions through her best-selling 2006 memoir, "Eat, Pray, Love" about her spiritual and geographical journey after her divorce, has a new book out on marriage.

"Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage" is about her government-forced marriage to her Brazilian boyfriend. I haven't read it yet, but enjoyed this discussion between Gilbert and Catholic author Ann Patchett in today's "Wall Street Journal."

Though she hardly has a sacramental view of marriage, Gilbert does ultimately believe the institution of marriage will endure:

2010: In with the New

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Yesterday, we looked back and examined the things we want less of in the new year and new decade. Today, let’s look forward and think of things we want more of in the coming years.

First, I want more pro-life Democrats and Republicans who are conscious of social justice issues. Those members of Congress like Democrat Bob Casey and Bart Stupak and Republican Anh Cao of Louisiana, the only Republican who voted for the bill in either chamber, find themselves at odds with the leadership of their political party. But, neither party is a perfect fit for the Catholic social justice tradition: The Dems have this huge gaping blind spot on abortion and the GOP is too busy trying to capitalism to notice its many inequities and indignities. Casey, Stupak and Cao are among those who actually embody the fullness of the tradition.

The Limits of Security

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The near bombing of the Northwest flight enroute to Detroit has brought us back to an obsession with security which was triggered by 9/11 and has spiked many times since.

The tension makes perfect sense on the face of it. Any time a would-be bomber slips through the layers of detection lives are in danger. Questions must be asked and holes plugged.

But as 2009 fades to black, I'm also reminded that the voices calling for repairs to the system are so often shrill, hysterical and utopian. They demand the kind of perfection that the Bible counsel us to avoid lest we lose our souls.

The Bible's argument, as I understand it, is that human project, while worthy, cannot avoid lapses and failures. It is our propensity toward mistake and error that can make us realize that we find our only security in Jesus Christ. Just as St. Paul said, religious law serves us by awakening us to our imperfection and the need for divine mercy.

2009: Out with the Old

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New Year’s is a time for looking back, as the various “lists” of the most important news stories or interesting people attest. And, for looking forward as the “predictions” being floated abound. I am not so good at predictions, and my memory is not what it once was. But, in the spirit of the holiday, today I offer some of the things from the past decade that we most hope not to see again and, tomorrow, things we hope to see more of.

First, I hope to see fewer government lies. Surely one of the most memorable moments in the decade just past was when Secretary of State Colin Powell testified before the U.N. Security Council about the existence of Weapons of Mass Destruction in Iraq. And, Powell was one of the good guys. He fell into a trap of cognitive deceit, and it doesn’t matter whether people knew they were lying or were so convinced by their own propaganda that they could not recognize a lie when they saw it. There were other lies, such as the canard that we can cut taxes without harming the long-term fiscal health of the nation, but that has moved beyond a simple lie to the status of a pernicious myth. Let’s hope there are less of them too.

Servant leadership

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I often hear the term "servant leadership" used to describe the leadership model that should be used by church leaders. Bishop Tom Gumbleton talks about this idea in his homilies; see for example, his homily for Sept. 24, which on our Web site, we titled Hierarchs and lower-archs in the church.

When Timothy M. Dolan was named archbishop of New York in February, Catholic News Service reported that he "pledged his life, his heart and his soul to the people of the archdiocese."

At a press conference, he said to the Catholics in New York: "I am so honored, humbled and happy at the prospect of serving as your pastor."

Dolan told the priests of the archdiocese: "The priests are on the front lines. I am their servant. You can count on me to help them. ... That's not a chore; that's a choice." (I don't mean to single out Dolan; he just popped up first in the word search.)

"Servant leadership," I suppose, is most often applied to bishops and pastors, but it would also apply to lay men and women who have leadership roles in the church.

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