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The dirty (with pesticides) dozen

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Choosing between eating local and organic is often confusing. For those committed to both supporting the local food production network and making it possible for small family farms to survive and eating food that is grown without chemicals, first choice is always local and organic.

But often the that choice is not available, due to the seasons or unavailability. For example, there are no local strawberries at a market but there are organic ones. What to do? Buy organic because strawberries are on a short list of foods that have a lot of pesticide residue when they are not organically grown. Since I can't get local, I get the organic variety for health reasons rather than for carbon footprint reasons.

If I'd been choosing a food that wasn't on the dirty dozen list below, I would choose local rather than organic because there wouldn't have been the personal health concern. In that case I would go for the lower carbon footprint.

Here is a list of foods that are worth buying organic over local, if you have to choose, because they carry more pesticides than other produce.

1. Peaches
2. Apples
3. Bell peppers
4. Celery
5. Nectarines

Catholic weddings in steep decline

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This news come amid the uproar surrounding gay marriage:

"According to statistics from the Archdiocese of Boston, only 3,727 couples were married in Catholic churches last year, less than half the 8,343 marriages celebrated in 2000. Across the border in New Hampshire, figures from past years weren't immediately available, but church officials said the 403 weddings celebrated last year in the Diocese of Manchester also represented a steep decline."

Hope from the Bronx for a sane Catholic center

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Overcoming polarization in the church often feels like the Catholic equivalent of bringing peace to the Middle East. Everybody pays lip service to it, and from time to time some bold new initiative is rolled out, but longtime combatants who have watched such efforts come and go generally feel in their bones that the reality is permanent war.

tIf peace is going to break out, therefore, it probably won’t be those veterans who make it happen.

Activists gather in Kansas City to resist nuclear weapons plant

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- There's a saying from the movie Field of Dreams that's become an almost unrecognizable part of the popular lexicon: "If you build it, they will come."

Of course, in the film the phrase refers to a crazy scheme somehow pulled-off by the the main character: building a baseball diamond in the middle of an Iowa cornfield to allow long-dead ghosts of baseball greats to play the sport they loved for the first time in decades.

For the past two days I've seen something of that crazy scheme come alive -- just not exactly in the way that the builders in this particular case might have liked.

Coming from across the nation by bus, train, and caravan, 60 activists gathered this weekend here to resist the building of a new nuclear weapons production facility, scheduled to be the nation's first construction of such a site in 32 years.

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In This Issue

August 28-September 10, 2015

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