National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

Distinctly Catholic

What To Do About Libya?

 | 

The crisis in Libya may have found its inspiration in the non-violent protests in Tunisia and Egypt, but it is now clear that non-violent protests will not dislodge this dictator, that Moammar Gaddafi intends to use, and is already using, all the violence at his command to retain power, that the United States completely lacks the kind of long-standing ties with senior military officials that might permit us to influence the stance of the Army, and that the opposition to Gaddafi is even less organized than the opposition to Mubarak. It is against these grim facts that those Libyans who are seeking to overthrow Gaddafi have now called for U.S. and other foreign military assistance to help them achieve their freedom.

What can and should the U.S. do?

Lame Excuses Dept.

 | 

The American Catholic tries to address the argument of some that the pro-life movement is oftentimes inconsistent, failing to address important pro-life issues other than abortion.

The reason given is that if the pro-life movement were more in favor of big government, it would be less inclusive. Huh?

Either anti-malaria programs in Africa are pro-life or they are not, and the decision to defund them must be seen in that context by pro-life advocates.

Either aid to women facing crisis pregnancies will help those women to decide to keep their child and carry it to term, and is consequently a pro-life policy, or it isn't. The American Catholic averts his eyes when it suits him. And, there is nothing pro-life about that.

Archbishop Gomez Takes Center Stage

 | 

Over at Whispers, Rocco Palmo has some great analysis - and photos and audio clips - of the change in leadership in the largest archdiocese in the land, Los Angeles.
This is an important milestone in the history of the American Church and, as Rocco suggests, a kind of return to our earliest origins, before Lord Baltimore and John Carroll and the Irish. It is becoming obvious, as well, that Gomez is well suited to carry on the commitment to social justice that was so central to Cardinal Mahony's legacy.

My Reply to Peters

 | 

Edward Peters, the canon lawyer who has suggested that Governor Cuomo be denied communion, responded to my post in which I restated my long-standing position that using Canon 915 to deny politicians communion is horrible theology. Furthermore, I argued that the canons of the Church exist to further the Church’s objective of saving souls, that the Church has many instruments and methods to accomplish that goal, and that many of us think that heavy-handed reliance on canonical penalties is actually a great cause of scandal and harms the Church as well as the potential for helping the person who is denied communion. To be clear: Edwards’ post is very thoughtful and intelligent and he makes the best case that can be made for his interpretation of how Canon 915 should be applied. But, he avoids addressing the point I made.

Peters Responds to Moi

 | 

Canon lawyer Edward Peters has responded to my post earlier today about the brouhaha he has begun regarding the fitness of the Governor of New York to present himself for communion.
Alas, at the moment I discovered his reply, I thought it my obligation to post it, not just leave it in a comment, which I have now done. At that same moment, a stiff breeze came through the window, reminding me that I am on holiday, that just outside the window are at least eight shades of turqoise water crashing against the unbelievably soft sand of Luqillo beach, and that as I am just finishing a very delicious but very large margarita, I had best respond tomorrow.
I will say this for the moment. Mr. Peters has rendered a thoughtful reply and those who are interested in this subject should read it - before margarita time. I promise to do so this weekend and reply with a thoughtful reply, if not tomorrow, soon.

Vox Nova, Wisconsin & Laborem Exercens

 | 

Our friends at Vox Nova look at the union-busting in Wisconsin through the lens of Laborem Exercens. Towards the end of his life, Pope John Paul II was asked which of his three social encyclicals was his favorite and he cited Laborem, his first, as his favorite. It is mine too. One wishes that there was a single Catholic Republican in the Wisconsin legislature who would read it and think twice before continuing with the assault on workers rights.

Pages

Subscribe to Distinctly Catholic

Feature-flag_GSR_start-reading.jpg

NCR Email Alerts