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The End of Don't Ask/Don't Tell

Not sure about you, but I feel safer already. Don't Ask/Don't Tell, the compromise policy, which was a step forward in its day, has officially ended. So, servicemen and women who happen to be gay, no longer have to worry about their personal lives being discovered and can better pay attention to their mission. Nor do they have to worry about being blackmailed by anyone. Nor do commanders have to worry about losing key staff at critical times.

I will venture the prediction that five years from now, people will have a hard time remembering what DADT was like. The military rose to the challenge of racial integration and it will rise to the occasion again. And, we will all be safer because of it not least because our values of equality and a decent respect for the privacy of others will be more fully enfleshed by consigning DADT to history.

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August 29-September 11, 2014

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