National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

Same-sex marriage in the United States

Judges rule to allow same-sex couples to marry in Arizona, Wyoming

 | 

A U.S. District Court judge's ruling that Arizona's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional "overturns the will of Arizona voters and reflects a misunderstanding of the institution of marriage," the state's Catholic bishops said Friday.

"For centuries, marriage has been recognized as the lifelong union of a man and a woman that benefits the common good by respecting the unique and complementary gifts of both a mother and a father in the lives of children," they said.

US bishops emphasize traditional marriage after Supreme Court action

 | 

After the Supreme Court on Monday declined to review rulings overturning five states' bans on same-sex marriage, several U.S. bishops criticized the court's inaction and reiterated that according to church teaching, traditional marriage is a union between one man and one woman.

Oklahoma City Archbishop Paul Coakley said the court's failure to review the Circuit Court decisions was "deeply disappointing."

Supreme Court allows gay marriage to expand to 30 states

 | 

The Supreme Court refused to get involved in the national debate over same-sex marriage on Monday, leaving intact lower court rulings that will legalize the practice in 11 additional states.

The unexpected decision by the justices, announced without further explanation, immediately affects five states in which federal appeals courts had struck down bans against gay marriage: Virginia, Indiana, Wisconsin, Oklahoma and Utah.

Utah same-sex marriage proponents want Supreme Court to rule, too

 | 

It's no coincidence that victors rarely ask for a rematch. When you've won, traditional wisdom says, walk away.

But for the Utah couples attempting to topple a state ban on same-sex marriage once and for good, there will be no turning back until their case -- or one like it -- lands at the U.S. Supreme Court.

Lawyers for the three plaintiff couples announced Thursday that they will join with Gov. Gary Herbert and Attorney General Sean Reyes in calling for the Supreme Court to hear their case.

It's an unusual move.

Utah asks Supreme Court for urgent intervention to halt same-sex marriage recognition

Utah asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to issue an emergency order that would prevent the state from recognizing the marriages of thousands of gay and lesbian Utahns, because the state believes it will ultimately prevail in its fight to revive a ban on such unions.

If it does, the state wrote, Utah will do "everything possible" to enforce the law. That means effectively nullifying the more than 1,000 unions gay and lesbian Utahns entered into during a 17-day window when such weddings were legal.

Utah to appeal gay marriage case to Supreme Court

The Utah attorney general announced Wednesday that he will go straight to the U.S. Supreme Court to challenge an appellate ruling that declared the state's ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

Attorney General Sean Reyes decided to leapfrog the full 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver after a three-judge panel last month upheld a lower-court ruling and declared that the U.S. Constitution's guarantees of equal protection and due process extend to gay men and lesbians who want to marry. It was the first time a federal appeals court had ruled on the issue.

San Francisco archbishop under fire for plan to speak at March for Marriage

 | 

San Francisco public officials and many religious leaders are angry -- very angry -- at the plans announced by Catholic Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone. He is listed as a speaker at the June 19 March for Marriage in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the National Organization for Marriage (NOM) and the Family Research Council, two groups that have taken some of the most hostile stances against same-sex marriage and LGBT people generally.

Rulings on same-sex marriage called 'mistake,' 'travesty of justice'

The 1996 Pennsylvania law that recognizes marriage between one man and one woman is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Tuesday, clearing the way for same-sex marriage in the state.

Reaction to the ruling in the Catholic community was swift and strong.

Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia in a statement called the decision by U.S. District Court Judge John E. Jones III to strike down Pennsylvania's Defense of Marriage Act "a mistake with long-term, negative consequences."

Pages

Feature-flag_GSR_start-reading.jpg

NCR Email Alerts

 

In This Issue

October 24-November 6, 2014

10-24-2014.jpg

Not all of our content is online. Subscribe to receive all the news and features you won't find anywhere else.