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Poverty

Pope Francis: Concern for poor is sign of Gospel, not red flag of communism

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Focusing on poverty and sacrificing for the poor are the heart of the Gospel, not signs of communism, Pope Francis said at his morning Mass.

Furthermore, if Christians don't dig deep and generously open up their wallets, they do not have "genuine faith," the pope said Tuesday during the Mass in the chapel of the Domus Sanctae Marthae.

He said people often hear, "Oh, this priest speaks about poverty too much, this bishop talks about poverty, this Christian, this sister talk about poverty. Well, they're a bit communist, aren't they?"

Climate encyclical expected to send strong moral message to the world

Pope Francis' upcoming encyclical on ecology and climate is expected to send a strong moral message -- one message that could make some readers uncomfortable, some observers say.

"The encyclical will address the issue of inequality in the distribution of resources and topics such as the wasting of food and the irresponsible exploitation of nature and the consequences for people's life and health," Archbishop Pedro Barreto Jimeno of Huancayo, Peru, told Catholic News Service.

War, greed, consumerism, 'cult of appearance' harm families, pope says

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Families are weakened and destroyed by war, "the mother of all forms of poverty," as well as by economies and policies that worship money and power, Pope Francis said.

"It's almost a miracle" that, even in poverty and crisis, the family can keep on going, safeguarding its bonds and staying intact, he said at his weekly general audience Wednesday in St. Peter's Square.

Pope’s concern for environment, the poor has Protestants paying attention

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Pope Francis has successfully gotten my Protestant attention.

He may not heal the rift our faiths made together during the Protestant Reformation of yore, but it surely looks small from the perspective of today. Christians agree on much more than not, like how Jesus predominantly and preeminently loved the poor and the marginalized. The rest of our differences, like ordination of women or natural law or hierarchical organization or the now understated infallibility doctrine, all pale in comparison to the witness of a man who washes feet and doesn’t waste words.

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