National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

Climate change

With Lima Accord reached, climate attention turns toward 2015

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Negotiators from nearly 200 countries struck a deal early Sunday morning in Lima, Peru, marking the first time that nations, large and small, developed and developing, agreed that each will make pledges aimed at cutting global greenhouse gas emissions.

The agreement, known as the Lima Accord, concluded two days after the scheduled end of the two-week (Dec. 1-12) negotiations, held among delegates representing 196 countries at the United Nations’ annual climate change conference, formally known as the 20th Conference of the Parties.

Catholic bishops to Lima delegates: end fossil fuels, tend to vulnerable in climate deal

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Citing an order “to treat respectfully Creation,” a group of Catholic bishops have called for an end of the use of fossil fuels, and for negotiators at the United Nations climate talks in Lima, Peru, to lay the foundation for an internationally binding agreement next year in Paris.

“Humankind on the Planet Earth is ordained to live in equity, justice and dignity, peace and harmony in the midst of the order of Creation. Humankind is ordered to treat respectfully Creation, which has a value in itself,” the bishops said.

Panel dissects ‘depressing’ climate change survey

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A survey released at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature Nov. 22-25 here reveals that people of faith do not consider climate change the most important issue facing the United States today nor do they believe they will be personally harmed by its impact. But they do see it as a crisis demanding governmental action now rather than later.

The survey, conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) in partnership with the American Academy of Religion, involved telephone interviews with more than 3,000 people.

We’re awestruck about Earth, unsure about global warming

But all that spiritual stargazing makes no difference in views about the facts of climate change and global warming, a new survey finds.

Just 5 percent of Americans thought climate change was the most important issue in the U.S. today. And religion was a major dividing point on how much -- or how little -- they think it’s a matter of concern, according to a new survey by the Public Religion Research Institute.

Vatican mulling interfaith climate summit

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The Vatican is considering calling a meeting of religious leaders to bring awareness to the current state of the climate and social inequalities resulting from a warming, technologizing planet, ahead of two key United Nations meetings on climate and sustainability set for 2015. 

The news came toward the end of a speech by Bishop Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, who in London Nov. 10 gave the annual Pope Paul VI lecture for the Catholic Agency for Overseas Development (CAFOD) -- the official Catholic aid agency for England and Wales.

Are we all Noahs?

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You wake up in the night. You wonder what’s gone wrong.

Did I really drive my car using up more fossil fuel yesterday? Will I drive it again tomorrow? Will my driving today destroy the world for my children tomorrow? What is wrong with me -- us --anyway?

Maybe we are all Noahs. Or at least our nightmares are his. Like Noah, we have become aware of God’s disappointment and wrath. Like Noah, we have heard the instruction to do something. We have wondered what took God so long to get mad. We have left a lot behind. We have followed divine orders.

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