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White House council calls for action on modern-day slavery

A White House advisory council of religious leaders called for a global fund to address human trafficking and urged a new labeling system to help identify consumer goods that were not created with slave labor.

With a 36-page report released Wednesday, the President's Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships hopes to build awareness of the estimated 21 million people worldwide who are subjected to sexual exploitation or forced labor.

Curbing gun violence 'builds a culture of life,' bishop tells senators

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Days before the Senate began debate over gun-control legislation, Bishop Stephen Blaire of Stockton, Calif., urged senators to support a bill that "builds a culture of life by promoting policies that reduce gun violence and saves people's lives in homes and communities."

Blaire, head of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, said in a letter to Senate members Monday that one bill, S. 649, was "a positive step in the right direction."

The bill requires universal background checks for all gun buys and makes gun trafficking a federal crime.

Chaplain deserves 'about three or four' Medals of Honor, say veterans

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President Barack Obama on Thursday awarded the Medal of Honor to famed Korean War chaplain Fr. Emil Kapaun, presenting it to the priest's nephew, Ray Kapaun, almost 22,604 days after his uncle's death in a prisoner of war camp.

"He should have got it long time ago," Joe Ramirez, a war veteran, told Catholic News Service in a telephone interview from Houston. Kapaun baptized Ramirez on July 19, 1950, the day after their regiment landed in Korea.

"He deserves about three or four of them," another soldier friend of the priest, Herbert Miller, told CNS.

Immigration rally cries out to Congress to fix range of problems

From across the country, by bus, plane and train, tens of thousands of people calling for comprehensive immigration reform covered the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, in one of more than a dozen similar events taking place around the United States.

Cries of: "Si, se puede," Spanish for "yes, we can," and "What do we want? Citizenship. When do we want it? Now!" rose from the crowd in Washington.

Opponents of gay marriage say they're not bigots

They are moms and dads, authors and activists, a former police officer and a former single mom. They're black and white and Hispanic. One's a Roman Catholic archbishop, another an evangelical minister. Many have large families -- including gay members.

They are among the leading opponents of gay marriage, or as they prefer to be called, defenders of traditional marriage. And they're trying to stop an increasingly popular movement as it approaches two dates with history this week at the Supreme Court.

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September 12-25, 2014

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