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Preview: Candomble fights persecution, mixes with Catholicism in Brazil


Cultivated in Brazil as early as 1549, the Candomblé faith is best described as a blend of African traditions and beliefs established as its own religion. Nearly 465 years after its founding, Candomblé remains an integral part of Brazilian culture.

Despite having little in common with Roman Catholicism, Candomblé has, for centuries, been successfully fused in the faith lives of many of the country's Catholics.

Though entirely of African descent, Candomblé exists only in Brazil -- primarily in Salvador, Rio de Janeiro and the country's northeast coast.

Decade after assassination of Sr. Dorothy Stang, work remains risky


In the 10 years since U.S.-born Sr. Dorothy Stang was killed by ranchers in the Amazon, the risks have not decreased, said one of the coordinators of the Brazilian bishops' Pastoral Land Commission.

Antonio Canuto, one of the commission's coordinators, said although the 73-year-old nun's assassination in Anapu brought awareness of the plight of the peasants with whom she worked, this has not been enough to decrease impunity in the region.

"The reality continues the same as it was when Sister Dorothy was alive," Canuto said.

Latin American church leaders call for church with 'Amazonian face'

Latin American church leaders apologized for historical complicity with colonial atrocities in the Amazon and called for a church with an "Amazonian face" in a pastoral letter issued as negotiators from around the world met for a climate summit here.

"The exploitation of the Amazon through mining, the expansion of farming and ranching, road construction, hydroelectric dams and timber companies demand that the church take a more prophetic stance," they wrote.



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November 20-December 3, 2015


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