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Sisters' Stories

Instead of gratitude, this ....

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Patricia McQuire, president of Trinity Washington University, writing for the Huffington Post, addresses the "true radicalism" of the U.S. sisters. They were the bricks and mortar of our Catholic school system and our Catholic hospital system. Now they are aging, numbers declining, with an the average age being 75 years. This is the time to be grateful to the sisters, she writes, adding,

Some holy women from history

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After I posted the blog, A few famous sisters, about the Washington Post web feature on famous, significant women religious, a reader sent me a note about a blog by Mary Lou Kownacki, an Erie, Penn., Benedictine.

Writing on the Monastery of the Heart website, Mary Lou says that when she first heard of the Vatican ordered reform of the LCWR, she was "as enraged as Samson who tore down a building with his bare hands." The rage has lessened to a low simmer, she continues, as she prepares for the days to come. Then she describes her preparation:

Every morning I read about a "saint" in a monthly periodical I subscribe to, "Give Us This Day: Daily Prayer for Today's Catholic" (Liturgical Press). In April alone I met these six women. ...

I stay close to these women, this communion of saints, because they remind me that, "if this is of God, nothing can destroy it." They teach me all I have to know of courage, of compassion, of creativity, of tenacity, of faith, of vision.

A few famous sisters

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Did you see this feature on the Washington Post website:

A few famous nuns
In light of the Vatican’s action on Wednesday, here is a list of nuns who have become known in the broader world. Two of the Americans listed have been canonized.

No real surprises in the slide show: Mother Teresa, Elizabeth Ann Seton, Katharine Drexel. Typing "catholic sister" in Google images will give you these search results. Let's be a bit more creative.

How about: Anita Caspary, Margaret Brennan, Dorothy Stang, Mary Luke Tobin, Joan Chittister?

Chime in here: Who are women religious who should have been named to that list? Post their photos to the Facebook page: Support Our Catholic Sisters

Presentation Sisters and their commitment to the poor

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Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary around the world are celebrating the life of their founder, Mother Nano Nagle.

It was 228 years ago today, April 26, 1784, Nano, ended a life of service to the poor in Ireland. On her deathbed she was to have given her daughter sisters the following injunction: “Love one another as you have hitherto done. … Spend your lives among the poor.”

'We are all nuns today'

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Mary E. Hunt, co-founder and co-director of the Women's Alliance for Theology, Ethics and Ritual (WATER) in Silver Spring, Maryland, writes that when it comes to the Vatican’s crackdown on women religious, I believe it’s time to declare that for the purpose of this struggle: we are all nuns.

The effort to rein in LCWR is meant as much to scare the rest of us into line as to corral the nuns. I can say with con?dence that it won’t work.

Gary Wills: Catholic sisters 'guilty as charged'

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Gary Wills, writing in The New York Review of Books, says the U.S. sisters are guilty at charged.

The Vatican has issued a harsh statement claiming that American nuns do not follow their bishops’ thinking. That statement is profoundly true. Thank God, they don’t. Nuns have always had a different set of priorities from that of bishops. The bishops are interested in power. The nuns are interested in the powerless. Nuns have preserved Gospel values while bishops have been perverting them. The priests drive their own new cars, while nuns ride the bus (always in pairs). The priests specialize in arrogance, the nuns in humility.

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September 12-25, 2014

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