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Supreme Court declines to give groups' HHS appeals preliminary review

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The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Monday not to consider preliminary appeals in lawsuits brought by several Catholic groups against the federal contraceptive mandate "means that the cases will proceed, without prejudice, in the lower federal court," according to Priests for Life.

Besides Priests for Life, the groups include the Washington archdiocese, The Catholic University of America, and Thomas Aquinas College.

Their cases are currently in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

West Virginia governor's veto of abortion bill called 'bitter news'

Bishop Michael Bransfield of Wheeling-Charleston said he was surprised at West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's veto of the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which would have prohibited nonmedical crisis abortions after 20 weeks post-fertilization.

Tomblin vetoed the bill late Friday.

"I am very surprised by Gov. Tomblin's veto of the Pain-Capable Act," the bishop said. "For most West Virginians, this is bitter news, especially on the heels of the governor's use of his ability to veto budgeted items to cut benefits to poor children and families in West Virginia."

World Vision reverses course on same-sex marriage policy

After announcing earlier this week it would no longer define marriage as between a man and a woman in its employee conduct manual, Christian relief organization World Vision reversed course Wednesday and said it would no longer recognize the same-sex marriages of its employees.

Heavy criticism from evangelicals may have prompted the reversal. Soon after the earlier groundbreaking decision, the Assemblies of God urged members to consider dropping their support.

World Vision to recognize employees' same-sex marriages

Editor's note: Since this story was published, World Vision has retracted its stance on same-sex marriage.

Christian relief organization World Vision has announced it will no longer define marriage as between a man and a woman in its employee conduct manual, a groundbreaking change for an evangelical institution and a reflection of the impact that gay marriage is having on religious organizations.

Supreme Court takes up Hobby Lobby's challenge to the contraception mandate

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When two corporations -- one owned by evangelicals and one owned by Mennonites -- filed suit over the Affordable Care Act, they described their complaint in stark and fairly simple terms: The government is forcing them to either break the law or betray their faith.

But at the Supreme Court on Tuesday, nothing was so clear as the justices explored the murky territory where an employer's religious rights collide with the interests of its employees or the government.

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October 10-23, 2014

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