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Faith & Parish

St. Louis archdiocese cancels speech by visionary who saw the Virigin Mary at Medjugrorje

To Roman Catholic officialdom, it's unclear whether the Virgin Mary appeared to Ivan Dragicevic and five others 34 years ago in a Bosnian village.

What is clear is that Dragicevic won't be appearing Wednesday to speak in St. Charles, as some had hoped.

Earlier this month, Archbishop Robert Carlson addressed a memo to priests and deacons in the archdiocese:

United Nations says Pope Francis will visit morning of Sept. 25


U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed the announcement that Pope Francis would visit the United Nations the morning of Sept. 25 to address the U.N. General Assembly.

In a statement Wednesday, the United Nations also said the pope would meet separately with the secretary-general and with the president of the General Assembly and would participate in a town hall gathering with U.N. staff.

Zaytuna College recognized as first accredited Muslim college in the US

A college that requires the study of both Wordsworth and the Quran for graduation is now the first fully accredited Islamic university in America.

Zaytuna College, a 5-year-old institution in Berkeley, Calif., was recognized earlier this month by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, an academic organization that oversees public and private colleges and universities in the U.S.

Debate over gays in St. Patrick's parades roils Irish on big day


St. Patrick's Day is associated as much with Roman Catholicism as it is with Irish-Americans, but this year, some of the faithful aren't happy with the inclusion of gays and lesbians marching under their own banner for the first time in parades in Boston and New York.

The Knights of Columbus of Massachusetts and a local Catholic school declined to take part in the Boston parade on Sunday after two LGBT groups -- the military veterans service group OutVets and Boston Pride -- were invited following decades of lobbying and court battles.

Wyoming college says declining federal funds protects Catholic identity


Wyoming Catholic College, a Catholic university founded in 2005 in Lander, announced in late February that it "shall not participate in federal student loan programs."

The decision came after months of analysis and deliberations by the college and its board of directors.

"While the financial benefits are undeniable," said a news release, "the increasingly burdensome regulatory requirements are clearly troubling for faith-based institutions."



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November 20-December 3, 2015


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