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Faith & Parish

It's all about communion


Today's first reading sounds like a description of a feast of fools. Who would brag that they were singled out to receive a special invitation addressed to the ignorant or a reserved place at the supper for the simple? Yet when Lady Wisdom sets the table in her mansion, she is very particular about her guest list -- she invites only the unpretentious.


Open to otherwise


As the United States gears up for the next presidential election in 2016, would-be contenders are already coming forward to announce their candidacies. As soon as each makes his or her intentions public, the race begins -- not the presidential race, but a parallel race bent on smearing the opposition by digging into their personal lives for every true or unsubstantiated detail that might cast doubt on their abilities, ethics, principles and values.

Want to ride the train to see the pope? You'll have to buy a lottery ticket


Anticipating a stampede of customers during Pope Francis' upcoming visit to Philadelphia, a regional rail line will hold an online lottery for 24-hour regional rail passes for travel on Sept. 26 and 27.

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, known as SEPTA, is reportedly selling 175,000 passes for each day of the pope's Philadelphia visit, for a total of 350,000 passes.

America welcomes Christians, Jews; atheists, Muslims not so much

Americans are all for religious freedom -- but disagree on who can claim it.

Diverse religious groups are recognized -- but Christians and Jews are significantly more welcome than atheists, and many don't see a welcome mat for Muslims. And not everyone means the same thing when speaking of a "Christian" nation.

So finds a new look at Americans' religious self-image, detailed in a LifeWay Research survey released Wednesday.

Federal prisons agree inmates can be 'humanists'

The Federal Bureau of Prisons has agreed to recognize humanism as a religion after settling a lawsuit brought by an Oregon inmate.

The move comes a year after the U.S. Army agreed to recognize humanism as a religious choice for service members and may signal a broader government willingness to recognize humanism, a system of beliefs that recognizes no deity and emphasizes rational thinking.



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In This Issue

November 20-December 3, 2015


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