National Catholic Reporter

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Accountability

'Donít even think about it' just isnít working anymore

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COLUMN

Change always happens one way or another. If it happens through the system, we call it evolution. If it happens despite the system, we call it revolution. The problem is that the spirit of revolution -- that unguided burst of change so often triggered by frustration or despair -- is in the air now, politically, economically and spiritually.

Almost half a century after the opening of the first session of the Second Vatican Council in October 1962, there is a new spirit in the church.

But the spirit that is rising in this church no longer pulses with the promise and energy of Vatican II. There is little sense of new possibilities now. The council’s mandate to welcome the fresh air of the Spirit has gone stale.

But not completely.

Legionaries reform process outlined

WASHINGTON -- The papally mandated reform of the Legionaries of Christ may take "two or three years or even more" and require the establishment of at least three commissions, the papal delegate overseeing the reform said in an Oct. 19 letter.

Italian Archbishop Velasio De Paolis, who was named by Pope Benedict XVI to the College of Cardinals the day after his letter was dated, urged members of the Legionaries to "set aside all suspicion and distrust" of one another during the process of reform and renewal of the order.

On sex abuse, pope needs to address root causes

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COMMENTARY

In an interview with National Public Radio this morning on the appointment of the newest batch of cardinals, NCR’s John Allen was asked what the new cardinals say about the church’s response to the sex abuse crisis.

Allen’s response was short and simple: “Pope Benedict believes the response to the scandal is not in sweeping change, but instead in what he calls spiritual rebirth.”

That answer recalls something the pope himself said Sept. 8.

It was barely noticed, but on that day the pope made perhaps his most significant (and most disturbing) statement about the church’s on-going sex abuse and cover up crisis.

“True renewal of the ecclesiastic community,” he said, “is the result less of structural changes than of a sincere spirit of repentance and an active path towards conversion.”

A Catholic news agency had this take on Benedict’s comment: “The solution to the problem of clerical sex abuse lies in a spirit of penitence and conversion, rather than a radical change of church structures, said Pope Benedict.”

Cybercrime hits Wisconsin parish

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MILWAUKEE -- Federal law enforcement officials were continuing to investigate how criminals were able to steal $121,000 electronically from a parish in the Milwaukee Archdiocese.

St. John Vianney Parish in Brookfield was the victim of cybercrime when individuals made several unauthorized withdrawals from the parish's general checking accounts, stealing money used for general parish operations. No parish or bank employee is suspected of any wrongdoing in the crime.

Canadian Orthodox bishop on leave for 'misconduct'

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TORONTO -- One of Canada's top Eastern Orthodox hierarchs has resigned his duties and been granted a leave of absence following allegations by police of “misconduct” going back decades.

Archbishop Seraphim of Ottawa, who has jurisdiction over all of Canada for the New York-based Orthodox Church in America, requested and was granted a leave of absence.

Irish priests form association; meeting hall overflows

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DUBLIN -- The inaugural meeting of a new association to represent the views of Irish priests drew six times more participants than organizers expected.

More than 300 priests were present at the first meeting of the Association of Catholic Priests in Port Laoise Sept. 15. Organizers had expected only 60 priests to attend, so the meeting was delayed while proceedings were transferred to a larger meeting hall.

Belgian abuse story is eerily familiar

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Analysis

James Joyce famously described history as a nightmare from which his literary alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, was trying to awake. For the Catholic church today, there’s no need to await history; the present, defined by a massive worldwide sexual abuse crisis, is nightmare enough.

Recent events in Belgium are “news” only in the sense that they’re new to Belgians. For more than a decade, sex abuse scandals have devastated the church in other parts of the world, from the United States to Ireland and Germany, and raised hard questions about the corporate response of the Vatican and the personal history of Pope Benedict XVI.

Benedict's in a box in talking about the crisis

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Analysis

London -- By now, declarations of papal contrition for the sex abuse crisis, such as that uttered by Benedict XVI this morning in Westminster Cathedral on day three of his Sept. 16-19 trip to the United Kingdom, have become almost routine.

As always, it seems, familiarity breeds contempt. The pope’s critics are becoming increasingly acerbic in denouncing these words as hollow, while some of his friends are openly questioning the value of endless apologies.

The dilemma Benedict XVI will have to face is whether to keep talking about the crisis every time he travels, and if he does, how to do it in a way that’s constructive.

Read the full analysis: Benedict's in a box in talking about the crisis

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April 11-24, 2014

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