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\"Mary, the Hibakusha\" brought to Saint Patrick's in New York

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Mary the Hibakusha, a statue found around 500 meters from ground zero after the 1945 U.S. atomic bombing of Nagasaki, was placed on the altar during a mass at Saint Patrick's Cathedral in New York on May 2, 2010, a day before the U.N. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. The statue was brought to New York by Mitsuaki Takami, archbishop of the Catholic Archdiocese of Nagasaki.

Mary the Hibakusha has become a messenger of peace and non-violence telling the world the horror and absurdity of nuclear weapons.

Speaking at the Non-proliferation conference, remembering the terrible toll of the nuclear attacks during World War II on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a senior United Nations official Monday appealed for an end to the use of the weapons, which remain an “apocalyptic” threat.

The two cities were destroyed in August 1945, and more than 200,000 people died of nuclear radiation, shock waves from the blasts and thermal radiation.

More than 400,000 more people have died – and are continuing to die – since the end of World War II from the impacts of the bombs.

Do we really care about democracy in the Philippines?

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With a week to go before the May 10 general election in the Philippines, presidential front runner Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III is ahead of his nearest rival, according to public-opinion surveys.

In a Pulse Asia poll, Aquino, the son of popular former President Corazon Aquino, held a 19-point lead over his nearest rival, Manuel "Manny" Villar, a real estate tycoon from an underprivileged background.

A Social Weather Stations (SWS) poll showed Aquino was 12 points ahead of Villar.

The two were almost neck and neck in a January SWS poll.

Loida Lewis, whose home is in New York and is head of the Philippine-American Association, has said that a 20 point or more lead will likely be necessary for Aquino, whom she backs firmly, to win, given what she expects will be widespread corruption in the election results. The incumbent government favors the Aquino rival.

Sadly, she notes, there is a good possibility that votes will not be counted properly. She has asked U.S. State Department officials to monitor the elections.

Back to 1984

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The story below reminds me of an incident with my sons a couple years back. We were visiting grandma and I heard of roars of laughter coming from the family room. I walked in to find them pointing to a rotary phone, which was my primary link to the outside world as a teenager.

"Dad, have you seen this? Does this work? How old is this thing? This must be from the 1900s."

Journalism professor asks students to go five days without modern technology.

A professor at the University of Minnesota asked her students to turn off their iPods, cell phones and laptops and turn on the 8-track players, landlines and typewriters.

Last month, Heather LaMarre, assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, asked the students in her principles of strategic communication course to go five days without using technology created after 1984.

Leviticus 19: 33-34

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One of the most heartening things about the immigrants rights movement today is the involvement by U.S. citizens who are people of faith. Thousands turned out in the streets around the country -- side by side with immigrants -- to demand humane immigration reform and to express outrage at Arizona legislation that cracks down on immigrants. The concern for immmigrants' rights is mirrored in migration theology, a growing area of scholarship that examines what the Bible has to say about how we treat "the stranger among us."

Migration theologians frequently cite Leviticus 19: 33-34. "When an alien lives with you in your land, do not mistreat him. The alien living with you must be treated as one of your native-born. Love him as yourself, for you were aliens in Egypt. I am the Lord your God."

The focus of migration theology is on the treatment of the "alien" in terms of charity and justice; they need our help and, according to the Biblical tradition of hospitality, we must respond. (See NCR, September 18, 2009, "Theology in the Age of Migration.")

Chaplain to the Status Quo

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It should not surprise that my reaction to Bishop Gene Robinson’s op-ed in the Washington Post is different from the glowing account rendered by my colleague Maureen Fiedler below. To correct the record, this was not a letter to Pope Benedict, although it pretended to be; Letters are sent by post, not in The Post.

It was a bit comic that Bishop Robinson said he would not presume to offer unsought advice to the Pontiff, and then proceeded to do precisely that. Almost as comic as the way he pats himself and his confreres on the back for their courage in changing the culture of his church and then goes on to list the actions they took to root out sexual abuse, all of which seemed remarkably similar to what the USCCB did at Dallas, a fact the bishop fails to mention..

Coverage of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

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The Natural Resources Defense Council Web site has a page devoted to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, with their own on-the-ground coverage together with many excellent articles that describe the disaster and its implications and meaning, including a thoughtful piece by Lisa Margonelli, which appeared in the New York Times -- "Driving Oil Dependence Down."

Other articles include "Which Would You Choose: Offshore Wind or Oil?"; "The Impact of the Oil Spill on Community"; and "From Canada to the Gulf Coast: The Unhealthy Tale of Petroleum," and many others. NRDC has called for a time out on new offshore drilling activities.

Take action by going to the Sierra Club's Web action page site, "Say NO to more dirty, dangerous offshore drilling."

Most read stories in April

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The most read stories on the NCR web site in April were, far away, the two stories Jason Berry filed about Fr. Maciel and the Legion of Christ: and . Following this stories were:


  1. NCR Today, our group blog

  2. Vatican disses one of its own on sex abuse, about Colombian Cardinal Dario Castrillón Hoyos

  3. Greensburg bishop denies women's order recruitment request

  4. Is middle ground possible on the Pope?, a column by John Allen

Episcopal bishop writes to the pope

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Sunday’s Washington Post printed an open letter from Episcopal Bishop V. Gene Robinson of New Hampshire to Pope Benedict XVI. Robinson is an openly gay bishop. He has been the center of controversy in his own church in recent years as it debated the ordination of openly gay and lesbian priests and bishops. (The Episcopal Church has since approved that policy, and is now in the process of welcoming its first lesbian bishop. Mary Glasspool).

Robinson’s letter to the pope focused on sex abuse, and he shared the problems that the Episcopal church once faced -- and they sound a lot like those the Roman Catholic church faces today in Europe and Latin America. Then, he outlined the steps the Episcopal church took to deal with the problem, saying that “we sought to change our church’s culture -- an effort that took no small amount of courage.”

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