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Digging out

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Like many in the Northeast, here in the New York we are emerging from a night of 60 mph winds and a blizzard that brought between 20 and 30 inches of snow to the metropolitan area. Lightning and thunder even accompanied the squalls. The blizzard was the sixth largest snowfall in New York City history. Interestingly, four of our top six snowfalls occurred in the last fourteen years. The other two storms took place 1888 and 1947.

The Northeast isn’t alone in battling extreme weather. The Minneapolis Metrodome collapsed two weeks ago after the fifth largest snowfall in the Twin Cities’ history deflated its roof. Last week, Great Britain was crippled by unprecedented snowfall, while Russia has been plagued with a severe ice storm that has shut down electricity to its major airports. Thousands are stranded, many without food or water.

Ongoing questions about ND's handling of the Seeberg case

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The University of Notre Dame is a U.S. Catholic success story. Through a mixture of romance and reality, myth and fact, football glory and Catholic identity, Notre Dame, for many, occupies a special place in the cultural imagination. One can understand, then, how much incentive exists to protect the institution, the brand, the value of the name.

But when does acting to protect the institution begin to erode the institution’s integrity and thus the very reputation that’s being protected?

The disturbing question is powerfully raised by Notre Dame alum and Politics Daily Editor in Chief Melinda Henneberger in a succession of essays, the latest of which can be found here, regarding the case of Lizzy Seeberg, the ND freshman who committed suicide a week and a half after accusing an ND football player of molesting her in his dorm room.

In today’s piece, questioning the pace of the investigation into Seeberg’s charges and the recent explanation by university president Fr. John Jenkins, Henneberger writes:

On this day

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On this day the Church celebrates the Feast of Saint John, Apostle, Evangelist.

In spite of the two titles used in the Church calendar, modern scholars no longer accept the idea that John the fisherman, the son of Zebedee, the brother of James, and one of the first four apostles chosen by Jesus, was the same person as the evangelist.


This is evident in The Apostles, by Pope Benedict XVI. He refers to the "Evangelist John" and "John the Evangelist" several times, including a reference to the evangelist's description of Jesus' first encounter with Peter and Andrew, James and John, never conflating the evangelist with the apostle.

Pat Robertson's Standup Stand

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For many decades, Pat Robertson has been a go-it-alone evangelist. He has built a large organization for the conversion of souls on the strength of his own leadership and has kept a respectful distance from other television preachers, many of whom have fallen victim of their wanton hungers.

He has embraced right wing, sometimes conspiratorial politics, which deluded him into considering himself a valid presidential candidate, and his geo-political-apocalypticaltheology flirts with lunacy (earlier this year I noted his bizarre claim that Haitians had brought the horrid earthquake by having made a pact with the devil long ago) but he is a smart guy with no small amount of dash and savvy when he sticks to what he knows.

This week his courage and open-mindedness were on full display when he announced that he had become the subject of conversion on the issue of marijuana.

Inside Job: the story behind our economic collapse

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Inside Job: The ones who really stole more than one Christmas and ruined lives

Charles Ferguson, the director who brought us the 2007 documentary about the inside story of the war in Iraq, “No End in Sight,” turns our attention to the causes of the 2008 financial meltdown in his current documentary “Inside Job.”

This is a better movie than Oliver Stone’s fictitious “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.” “Inside job” is riveting. It is no Michael Moore mockumentary, such as “Capitalism: a Love Story” filled with slight of hand and irony. The one thing all have in common, however, is the absurdity of people getting rich by using whatever regulatory system is left to do their own bidding and consequences be damned.

On condoms, has the Vatican rejected the Pharisees?

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By JOHN L. ALLEN JR.

tWhile it’s no secret that many liberal Catholic theologians have long questioned church teaching on birth control, an equal-and-opposite row among conservatives has often flown below radar. In those circles, the question isn’t so much whether devices such as condoms ought to be embraced, but whether they’re so intrinsically evil that they necessarily add an element of sin to any sexual act.

tSome prominent Catholic observers say that question has now been settled by the Vatican, and in a way that pulls the rug out from under some of the church’s most unyielding pro-life voices.

tEnglish Catholic writer Austen Ivereigh claimed in an analysis yesterday for America magazine that the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has, in effect, rejected what he called a “Pharisaical” position on condoms that Ivereigh associates primarily with “pro-life ultras in the English-speaking world.”

tIn a similar vein, Italian Vatican writer Sandro Magister wrote that hard-liners “cannot help but be disappointed” by what the doctrinal congregation has said.

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In This Issue

August 28-September 10, 2015

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