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Japan's nuclear crisis sparks conversation on energy safety

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"The ongoing nuclear crisis in Japan as a result of the devastating 9.0 magnitude earthquake and massive tsunami on March 11, has touched off renewed discussions about managing the risks and benefits of nuclear power in the United States." writes Andrew Freedman on the Natural Resources Defense Council On Earth blog.

"With 104 nuclear reactors currently providing about 20 percent of America's electricity, and a coalition of Republicans and Democrats -- including President Obama -- pushing for the construction of multiple new facilities, the prospect of a significant change in public support for this renewable form of energy carries with it significant implications for how the U.S. can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to fight global climate change."

His article also contains many useful links to other sites with good information about the ongoing situation in Japan's nuclear power sites.

'Too cheap to meter': The top 10 myths of nuclear power

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Documentary filmmaker Michael Rose lists the top ten myths about nuclear power generation on the Huffington Post Green blog.

"Lewis Strauss who chaired the Atomic Energy Commission in 1954, the predecessor of today's Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NRC), spoke of an era when "atomic furnaces" from fission and fusion reactors would provide clean, safe, reliable, abundant and cheap power for generations to come. Such power would be 'too cheap to meter.' It hasn't been the panacea he foretold. In fact, it's been a train wreck of accidents, cost overruns, nuclear weapons proliferation and an ever-growing waste problem that is always on the verge of being solved."

A glimpse into our own future

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Steve Hallett and John Wright, authors of Life Without Oil: Why We Must Shift to a New Energy Future write on the Huffington Post Green blog about Japan's nuclear disaster as a glimpse into our own future.

"When a confluence of events line up to expose an irrefutable but wickedly ugly truth, the phenomenon comes to be known as a perfect storm. Japan's devastating March 11 earthquake, tsunami, nuclear emergency and humanitarian crisis would better be described as a series of ever-worsening perfect storms.

"Though few people yet realize it, these events are a clear but frightening glimpse into the future of our world as carbon fuels upon which we have relied for the past two centuries dwindle. These incidents have already exposed the world's energy vulnerability.

"The sooner people and policy makers realize it, the faster and more effective we can be at implementing clear-headed, sensible plans for our energy future. No country is anywhere close to being prepared."

Celibacy and androgyny

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Celibacy is popularly understood as a rejection of anything to do with sex because we assume that God is asexual, and that sex is a gross distraction from an authentic spiritual life. In more positive terms, celibacy is seen as an option to forego sexual pleasure and intimacy in order to dedicate one self more fully to God and to God’s mission of love and service to others. Despite the positive meaning, the anti-sexual asceticism prevails, inhibiting a more informed understanding of this life-option. The call to celibacy needs a fresh appraisal.

Catholic Relief Services project in the Philippines links small farmers to restaurants

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Business World, a newspaper published in the Philippines, referenced Catholic Relief Services’ successful agroenterprise program there recently. The program trains poor farmers to produce and market specific vegetables needed by the country’s leading fast-food chain.

Paying for the perfume: What a mystic looks like

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Twentieth-century spiritual leader Thomas Merton wrote, “God is everywhere, His truth and his love pervade all things as the light and the heat of the sun pervade our atmosphere. We are called to be mystics, each and every one of us.”
What does it look like to be a mystic? Here’s my list of some characteristics.

The mystic celebrates relationality.
Scientists, striving mightily to find the basic building blocks of matter, discovered the subatomic particles called quarks. Yet to their dismay they found that quarks to not exist as independent units but rather come in pairs. They exist only in relationship. At the very heart of matter is a mutual dependency, a woven-together web. We humans exist in the midst of a complex web, as well.

So the mystic sees, for example, making love as a mutual and often sacred experience. The mystic knows the necessity of friendship, of the acceptance of brokenness and loss, of maintaining an intimacy with the natural world. The mystic trusts that since life is indeed a complex web of interconnections, nothing is ever really lost. Ultimately every difficulty is an opportunity. These are some ways to live relationally.

Eco puns

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News of a coming flood was leaked.

Canyons can be gorge-ous.

The snowstorm arrived at a fortuitious moment. It was white on time.

Lightning storms can be very striking.

To spot a glacier you have to have good ice sight.

The weather bureau is an umbrella organization.

If you breathe heavily on the map, it will reveal topography, he said with a sigh of relief.

A spelunker held out on revealing the treasure's location until he finally caved in.

When the fog burns off it wont be mist.

The color of the early morning sun: rose

If we canteloup, lettuce marry

On organic farms they till it like it is

With fronds like you, who needs anemones?

She beat him to the garden by pre-seeding him
During a meeting about earthquakes there were several motions.

A toothless termite walked into a tavern and said, "Is the bar tender here?"

A chicken crossing the road is poultry in motion

The chickens were distraught when the tornado destroyed their home. Hopefully they will be able to recoup.

Too many spiders in your house can turn it into a no fly zone

200 years from the final buffalo hunt will be a bisontennial.

Tips for starting a parish vegetable garden

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We love our organic vegetable garden at St. Pius X church in Mission, Kansas. Here’s why: 1) It is a great community-builder 2) We’re pleased we can use some of our unused land for good purposes 3) It motivates people to grow their own food which is good for the Earth 4) It’s a focal point for all our green efforts. Our garden has worked so well for us that I want to encourage you to consider it for your parish if you have the available land.

Book review: Eaarth, by Bill McKibben

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EAARTH
MAKING A LIFE ON A TOUGH NEW PLANET
By Bill McKibben
Published by Times Books, $16.95

No, it’s not a typo. McKibben spells it “Eaarth” to emphasize that we are not living on the same planet as we used to, thus its new name. It’s quite a sobering idea, but one you’ll find almost irrefutable after reading all of McKibben’s facts, figures, and stories. If you are new to McKibben, he is a journalist and the author of more than 12 books, including The End of Nature and Deep Economy, and is the founder of the environmental organizations Step It Up and 350.org.

In my zeal and enthusiasm for this book, I’d like to tell you every great thing I learned, but mostly I just want you to read it yourself. In fact, I’m begging you to PLEASE read this book, because we all need to get up to speed on the real state of the planet’s health, the factors at work, and what can be done about it. As an avid environmentalist, I thought I knew a lot about the planet’s woes. I was wrong. I had no idea how serious it is.

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September 12-25, 2014

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