National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

To the [eco] links: The Lorax, Santorum and a wondrous waterfall

 |  Eco Catholic

The weekend is near, and while the weather may be nice enough for the golf links in some areas, here's a schmorgesborg of links to a variety of environmental stories making the news in recent weeks. There’s climate change, recycling, politics, pro-life, movies, a miraculous waterfall and even the Girl Scouts. Certainly, there’s something for all. Enjoy. And enjoy the weekend.

The Lorax has finally returned … to theaters, at least. And he’s coming with plenty of friends - the EPA, Hilton Hotels, Whole Foods, Madza, Pottery Barn Kids and IHOP - in a new approach toward movie tie-ins – focusing on planet-saving activities rather than plastic toys in kid’s meals. [USAToday.com]

Presidential candidate Rick Santorum created a lot of buzz with his recent “man above earth” remarks. James Woods of the New Yorker decided to take a closer look at Santorum’s planet, and the theology – which he argues sounds more Protestant than Catholic – driving his viewpoint. [Newyorker.com]

Public Radio International examined the void of climate change talk among this year’s presidential candidates, a stark contrast to the last election when then-candidate Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said, “It’s real. It’s a danger to our planet, it’s a danger to the future of these young people who are in front of me and their children. And it’s got to be stopped.” [Pri.org]

The question of whether environmental concerns fall under the definition and scope of “pro-life” has garnered some attention recently, as well. Rob Sisson, president of Republicans for Environemntal Protection, argues it is, while Bill Patenuade, author of the blog Catholic Ecology, wonders if the opposing sides can come together in a unified effort.

Visit our new website, Global Sisters Report!
rectangular-logo.jpg

This March, Girl Scouts across the country will go door-to-door for a reason other than selling you cookies. In celebration of its centennial, Girl Scouts USA has teamed with the World Wildlife Fund’s Earth Hour project, encouraging their neighborhoods to use eco-light bulbs, and turn out the lights for Earth Hour at 8:30 p.m., on March 31. [Ens-newswire.com]

It may be a mild winter for many across the country, but that hasn’t stopped NPR from examining the growing use of gardens in therapy for people with mental health issues. Called horticultural therapy, much remains unknown about its effect, though signs point is the act of tending to a garden seems to reduce stress levels. [NPR.org]

Ever wonder how electric cars can catch on without easy access to charging stations? Researchers at Stanford University are seeking a solution in the form of wireless charging technology embedded in highways and other roads. [Ecogeek.org]

A new study shows that vehicle fuel efficiency has risen 14 percent among new model cars over the last four years. 2012 model cars saw an increase of 2.8 mpg compared to their 2008 counterparts, with this year’s line of trucks up 1.6 mpg from four years ago. [Treehugger.com]

Bottled water, beware. Your days could be numbered. The National Park Service recently announced disposable water bottles as one more thing you can leave at home when visiting the Grand Canyon [Nytimes.com], while some college students have sought to issue a ban themselves of the plastic containers on college campuses, a campaign none too pleasing to the International Bottled Water Association. [NPR.org]

Who thinks climate change is a big issue? Apparently, many Latino Americans, with as many as 73 percent viewing it as a high priority issue and two-thirds calling it a top priority for the president. Some have attributed the higher concern to a closer connection to Latin American countries, who being near the equator, have seen more dramatic evidence of climate change than people in the U.S. [Foxnews.com]

And who doesn’t think climate change is a big issue? Well, quite a few Americans, some of whom read this blog. In an op-ed piece, Andrew J. Hoffmann of the University of Michigan and Peter C. Frumhoff of the Union of Concerned Scientists try to examine the split among Americans on this sensitive subject, and how they can come together. [Kansascity.com]

If you don’t religiously seek out reruns of Xena the Warrior Princess, you probably haven’t seen actress Lucy Lawless – or thought of her, for that matter – in quite some time. Well, there she was this week, teaming with Greenpeace in “occupying” an oil drilling ship off the coast of New Zealand. [Alaskadispatch.com]

When people think of New York’s Central Park, they often won’t have visions of the city’s subway tunnels. Well, a new project seeks the blend the two drastically distinct scenes into one underground park, featuring actual plant life and plenty of dry days. [Grist.org]

And finally, hundreds of photographers recently flocked to Yosemite National Park in California to catch a glimpse and a snapshot of a wondrous spectacle – the park’s Horsetail Fall, which appears like flowing lava each year in late February. You can see the awe-inspiring image above, and read about it here. [Ap.org]

NCR Comment code: (Comments can be found below)

Before you can post a comment, you must verify your email address at Disqus.com/verify.
Comments from unverified email addresses will be deleted.

  • Be respectful. Do not attack the writer. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the original idea will be deleted. NCR reserves the right to close comment threads when discussions are no longer productive.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through. If you see something objectionable, please click the "Report abuse" button. Once a comment has been flagged, an NCR staff member will investigate.

For more detailed guidelines, visit our User Guidelines page.

For help on how to post a comment, visit our reference page.

 

Feature-flag_GSR_start-reading.jpg

NCR Email Alerts

 

In This Issue

April 11-24, 2014

04-11-2014.jpg

Not all of our content is online. Subscribe to receive all the news and features you won't find anywhere else.