National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

Distinctly Catholic

Making the Moral Case for Unions

 | 

Michael Kazin, at The New Republic, writes about how a small union organizing effort at Georgetown University is succeeding in large part because it has made an explicitly moral case for its efforts. This moral argument has attracted many allies who might otherwise be uninterested were the union's case built solely around an argument for advancing the interests of its members. There is a lesson here for the broader progressive community: They need a moral argument, a narrative, if they want to win in the court of public opinion and, in the event, they have a good moral argument to make.

Unions (and Wisconsin Voters) Push Back

 | 

Wisconsin voters have collected more than enough signatures to mount a recall effort against one of several GOP state senators being targetted for a recll election because they supported the effort of Gov. Scott Walker to attack collective bargaining rights.
Reaction, in both senses of the word, produces a counter-reaction.
The GOP over-reach in Wisconsin is proving to be just that, an over-reach. Elected because of a dreary economic climate, the GOP mis-interpreted its mandate to mount a full-scale attack on fundamental rights. Americans don't like that. And, in a democracy, the people have the power to make the GOP pay for its over-reach. On Wisconsin!

Johnson's book and lessons from history

 | 

In reading about the decision of the U.S. bishops' doctrine committee to condemn a 2007 book by Sr. Elizabeth Johnson of Fordham University, my thoughts turned back to another story of ecclesiastic condemnation in the late 19th-century regarding the writings of Henry George. Back then, some U.S. prelates argued that condemnations were ill-suited to the American temperament and were likely to produce more harm than good.

Real Socialized Medicine

 | 

Bless their hearts, the Vermont House of Representatives passed a bill that puts the Green Mountain state on the path to a single-payer health care system. At a time when many states are looking for ways to frustrate the health care reform law, how welcoming to find a state that is moving the ball further than the White House could move it last year. A single-payer health care system is the best solution, and always has been, and ,yes, it is socialized medicine and I am all for it.
(H/T- Ben Smith at Politico)

Newman Scholar Ian Ker to Speak at CUA

 | 

Father Ian Ker wrote the definitive biography of Cardinal, and now Blessed, John Henry Newman and was honored by the Holy Father at the Mass of Beatification for Newman last year. He will be giving a lecture at Catholic University on April 27, 2011 at 4:15 on the topic, "Newman's Idea of a University - Some Misunderstandings." The lecture is part of the year-long festivites commemorating the inauguration of John garvey as President of the Catholic University of America, all organized around the theme "Intellect and Virtue." The lecture will be held in the Great Room at the Pryzbyla Center on campus. This is a must-attend lecture.

Galston is Wrong

 | 

Bill Galston, of the Brookings Institution, is a very smart man and I disagree with him very rarely. But, in a post at New Republic this morning, he gives President Obama some really bad advice about answering the forthcoming budget proposals from Cong. Paul Ryan.
Ryan is one of the stars of the new GOP - he is articulate and smart, and he seems to know the budget inside and out, better than almost any of his colleagues to be sure. But, his proposals, if they track with his "Roadmap," are likely to take aim at some of the core programs Democrats hold dear, starting with Social Security and Medicare.

Sullivan Looks at Newt's Outreach to Evangelicals

 | 

Amy Sullivan, who is one of the few journalists who really understand religion and the religio-political landscape, looks at Newt Gingrich's attempts to reach out to Evangelical voters in a post at Time magazine. It is more than passing strange that the new Catholic Gingrich should be courting Rev. John Hagee who thinks Catholicism is the "great whore." But, with Donald Trump becoming a birther and Michelle Bachmann considering the race (for those who think Sarah Palin is just too much of a nerdy intellectual), the GOP presidential sweepstakes promises to be strange indeed.

Of Hedgehogs & Foxes

 | 

Sir Isaiah Berlin begins his justly famous essay on Tolstoy by invoking a fragment of poetry found in Athens and attributed to Aeschylus. The fragment read: “The fox knows many things; the hedgehog knows one big thing.” Berlin than goes on to categorize certain great contributors to Western civilization based on whether they were foxes or hedgehogs, whether they pursue many ends or relate all ends to a central objective or theme, whether their ideas exhibit centripetal or centrifugal tendencies, whether they are pluralists or monists. Among the foxes, Berlin puts Shakespeare, Herodotus, Aristotle, Montaigne, Erasmus, Moilere, Goethe, Pushkin, Balzac and Joyce. Among the hedgehogs, he places Dante, Plato, Lucretius, Pascal. Hegel, Dostoevsky, Ibsen and Proust.

Cardinal Scola on Libya

 | 

Cardinal Angelo Scola of Venice, who has been at the forefront of inter-religious and inter-cultural dialogue between Christians and Muslims has some interesting comments about the situation in Libya at Sussidiario.
Among other things, Scola says, "What I can observe is that we Europeans are often victims of a strong presumption. We think we know how to evaluate and solve problems without taking account of the testimony of those who live in these situations. This often prevents us from considering all the factors in play." It seems to me that President Obama's cautious approach to the situation reflects, in part, this concern that Scola pinpoints, the sense that "we know best in the West" which, as we learned tragically in Iraq, is not always the case.

Is Hell Empty?

 | 

The question of whether or not hell is empty is an old, but it is getting new life because of a forthcoming book by an evangelical preacher who holds the universalist position. Father Robert Barron who teaches theology at Mundelein recaps the history of the debate and sides with the position of the great Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar, namely, that we have reason to hope that hell is empty.
This article recalled an event in the 1990s, I can't remember exactly when. The Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, made a reference to Balthasar's teaching in this regard at one of his Wednesday General Audiences. It happened to be during the summertime when Cardinal Raztinger was on holiday. The Italian press had a field day with headlines that said, as I recall, "While Ratzinger is away, Pope becomes heretic." But, Balthasar catches something important, and it is the thing that drove Pope John Paul II in his finer moments. Of course we can't know if hell is empty, but in contemplating the power of the Cross, we must hope that it is so.

Pages

Subscribe to Distinctly Catholic

Feature-flag_GSR_start-reading.jpg

NCR Email Alerts

 

In This Issue

July 18-31, 2014

07-18-2014_0.jpg

Not all of our content is online. Subscribe to receive all the news and features you won't find anywhere else.