National Catholic Reporter

The Independent News Source

Distinctly Catholic

Another Organ, Another Memory

 | 

One of the commenters on my blog post about playing the organ at St. Joseph’s Church mentioned going on an “organ crawl” in Holland. For those unfamiliar with the term, an “organ crawl” is when one or more organists make a tour of instruments in a region. I do not know why the word “crawl” is employed, except that some organs are in lofts with difficult access.

In the event, my organ crawl of Northeast Connecticut continued this weekend. On Friday, I went to St. Mark’s Episcopal Chapel in Storrs, Connecticut, located right on the campus of the University of Connecticut. St. Mark’s hosts a 1978 organ built by John Brombaugh, an organ builder in Oregon. In that summer of 1978, I was a go-fer on the project of installing this organ and learned a great deal about the intricate mechanics of the instrument.

Feliz Fiesta!

 | 

Today is the Solemnity of the Birth of St. John the Baptist, the patronal feast of the island of Puerto Rico and especially of the archdiocese of San Juan. So, a hearty "Feliz Fiesta" to Archbishop Roberto Gonzalez of San Juan and to all our readers on that blessed isle.

Good News on Immigration?

 | 

At the New Republic, Peter schrag writes about a new memo from the Obama administration that suggests a more humane way forward on deportations and other immigration-related policies. It is about time, as Schrag notes. It is also necessary that those of us concerned about immigrants keep the pressure on the administration. Gay rights activists, especially fundraisers, made it clear to the administration that unless the White House put all its efforts behind the effort to repeal Don't Ask, Don't Tell, those activists would sit out the next election. We should not sell our support cheaply either and must make sure that the words in the hopeful memo are actually translated into action on the ground.

Must Read on Philly

 | 

I know, I know: Who wants to read something that is sure to depress them? But, read it we must. Philadelphia Magazine has a long story about the sex abuse scandal that continues to rock that city.

The most damning quote:

"When you spend that much time in the Vatican,” a St. Louis priest said of Rigali a decade ago, “you’re like one of the Bernini columns, just one of many holding up the place. You don’t want to draw attention to yourself.” Rigali is gentle and caring, quick to show up at the bedside of an ailing priest. But he is not dynamic. “Justin Rigali wouldn’t have enough inner authority to say in a homily, ‘Love your neighbor,’” said the priest. “He would say, ‘As the Pope said when he was in Toronto: Love your neighbor.’”

And, as rumors continue that Cardinal Rigali will soon be replaced, we can only hope and pray that Rome understands Philadelphia needs a bishop who will be a balm-speader for that troubled archdiocese, not a bomb-thrower.

Crazy Cons Attack Card. O'Malley

 | 

Earlier this week, I called attention to a posting by Boston’s Cardinal Sean O’Malley, OFM Cap, at his blog, in which he spoke about the Church’s stance towards contemporary issues regarding gays and lesbians, defended the Church’s beliefs about traditional marriage, and placed the Church’s stance on gay marriage properly alongside the Church’s stance against divorce and other threats to traditional marriage.

Most importantly, Cardinal O’Malley placed the entire issue of defending traditional marriage within the Church’s most fundamental anthropological and ethical belief, the inviolability of human dignity. The key graphs in O’Malley’s statement read:

Huntsman's Mormon Faith

 | 

Dan Gilgoff at CNN has an article up about the religiosity of newly minted presidential aspirant and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman. Like Mitt Romney, Huntsman is a Mormon, but the two seem to approach their religion quite differently.
There is a lot to learn about Huntsman, and examining a candidate's religion has become par for the course, which is not entirely unwelcome. Before we entrust the vast powers of the presidency to any man or woman, we should know a lot about what does and does not motivate them, whence they derive their values, what influences have shaped their worldview. It is imperative, however, that Americans embrace the spirit of the Constitution's ban on religious tests for office. As voters, we tend to embrace a whole range of concerns and considerations when assessing a candidate, but it is bigotry to consider a person's religion against them. A candidate should be able to explain how his or her religion does or does not inform their views, but we are not electing a Theologian-in-Chief.

Obama's Speech

 | 

Generally speaking, when a President finds a speech being criticized alike by the more extreme partisans of both left and right, he probably got it just about right.
Last night, President Obama outlined his policy regarding the war in Afghanistan. The increase in troops he ordered in January 2009, the "surge," always came with a timetable. Obama never gave Gen. Petraeus an open-ended engagement nor, to be clear, did Petraeus ever ask for one. Naturally, any commander would rather have more resources than fewer, but Obama's decision to draw down 10,000 troops this year and an additional 23,000 next year reportedly fell within the parameters Petraeus outlined.

Pages

Subscribe to Distinctly Catholic

Feature-flag_GSR2.jpg

NCR Email Alerts

 

In This Issue

April 11-24, 2014

04-11-2014.jpg

Not all of our content is online. Subscribe to receive all the news and features you won't find anywhere else.