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Kaveny on Obstacles to Evangelization


Cathleen Kaveny has posted what I hope will be the first of many items on obstacles to evangelization. Unlike much of the conversation about the "New Evangelization," which tends to focus on the use of twitter and the such, Kaveny goes to the root.

Do people in the developed world frame the fundmental existential problem in the way that Christianity does? As I understand it, the fundamental question that Christianity tries to answer is that posed by the rich young man in the Gospel: What must I do to obtain eternal life?

Kaveny notes that modern man experiences life differently from the way it was experienced in earlier times. We live longer and our faculties diminish. The idea of eternal life may not be as compelling as it once was. But, of course, it is the loneliness of death for those left behind that poses the existential question at its most acute: We Catholics should not desire eternal life, full-stop. We wish to live forever with those we love, beginning with God who is revealed to us as Love Himself.

The Olympics Begin


The Olympic Games open tonight and for the next two weeks, all other news will take a back seat as the leading athletes from around the world compete in London. There is something about the simplicity of athletic competition that appeals to our hearts: Usain Bolt, the Jamaican superstar sprinter who literally ran away with the men’s 100 meter dash four years ago may or may not face a challenge from his competitors, but no one will get to the top of the medal stand on the strength of influence peddling, insider trading, still less with any kind of compromise. The athletes win because they are, to quote the Olympic motto, swifter, higher or stronger than the competition.

Sr. Carol at CACG


Sr. Carol Keehan has a wonderful essay at this week's "Common Good Forum," the weekly essay on Catholic social teaching posted at Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good. You can read it by clicking here. And be sure to check out the video prepared by CHA that is hyperlinked in Sr. Carol's article. That video, and Sr. Carol's essay, does a better job explaining and promoting the Affordable Care Act than anything to come out of the White House of the HHS. Maybe she should be their press secretary!

Weigel Attacks Church's Social Magisterium (Again!)


George Weigel’s voice never carries deep, because he has long since abandoned any claim to depth of analysis, but it carries far. His column is widely syndicated to Catholic newspapers through the Denver Catholic Register. Just so, Weigel’s voice should be countered when he writes something that is offensive to the Church’s social magisterium which he claims to champion. His column this week is one more piece of noxious evidence that Weigel has simply become a partisan hack of the highest order. Let us examine some of his claims in this latest piece of agitprop.

In Context & Out


The presidential campaign in recent days has been focused on a speech President Obama delivered in Roanoke almost two weeks ago. In that speech, the President said, “If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help. There was a great teacher in your life. Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive. Somebody invested in roads and bridges. If you’ve got a business, you didn’t build that. Somebody else made that happen.” It seems pretty obvious from the context that the “that” in the penultimate and last sentences referred to infrastructure.

Nonetheless, the Romney campaign pounced, lifting only the last two sentences of the president’s peroration, and arguing that the president was being disrespectful to the hard work of entrepreneurs. Team Romney crafted a powerful television ad featuring Jack Gilchrist, a small businessman in New Hampshire, who looked into the camera and asked, “My father’s hands didn’t build this company? My hands didn’t build this company? My son’s hands aren’t building this company?”

First CCHD; Now CRS


We have seen these witch hunt tactics before. The parallel magisterium over at LifeSiteNews has taken exception to Catholic Relief Services because of a grant it made for emergency assistance - food, basic nutrition services, sanitation and clean water - to CARE. The grant did not fund abortions. The grant did not fund contraceptives. But, the President of CARE, Helene Gayle, is an outspoken support of abortion rights. Shame on her, to be sure. But, no shame on CRS.

A few years back, it was the parallel magisterium of Judie Brown that attacked the Catholic Campaign for Human Development along similar lines. They knew someone who knew someone who had a connection to Planned Parenthood, or something like that. It is all so much foolishness.

Romney's Speech to VFW


Mitt Romney went to the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention yesterday to deliver what his campaign termed a “major foreign policy address.” In a campaign that has been largely focused on domestic economic issues, Romney’s speech was “major” in comparison to the silence on the issue that preceded it. But, it was not “major” in the sense of introducing any actual guide to how he would conduct foreign policy if he were to be elected in November. Like the tax returns he refuses to release, Romney is not showing his policy cards in this area.

Most of the speech was dedicated to a reiteration of American exceptionalism. Now, I happen to think America is exceptional in many ways. But, people who think America is exceptional can, in foreign policy matters, easily slide into hubris of the kind all Americans witnessed when then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld predicted that the war in Iraq would cost about $50 billion and essentially be over in six months. Ten years and roughly a trillion dollars later, we have finally extricated our military from the quagmire Rumsfeld’s hubris got us into.

Say No to Hyatt Until Hyatt Says Yes to Workers


Interfaith Worker Justice continues its campaign for better working conditions at Hyatt Hotels with a post by Mia Fill.

Hyatt and other corporations the treat their workers badly may be able to stay within the narrow confines of the law, but they do not deserve anyone's patronage until they clean up their act with the same devotion that their housekeepers clean up the rooms.


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In This Issue

September 25-October 8, 2015


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