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Politics & the Olympics

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The Winter Olympics in Sochi once again invite reflection upon the relationship of sports to politics. When the fifth of five electric snowflakes failed to morph into one of the Olympic rings at the opening ceremonies, it was seen as emblematic of the contrast between Russia’s aspirations to greatness and their still woefully inadequate technology and tolerance.

Deneen Stirs Up More Trouble

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Patrick Deneen likes to stir up trouble. In a new article at The American Conservative, he writes about the divisions within the Catholic Right between the Neuhaus, Weigel, Novak crowd and the Communio Brigade led by David Schindler. Of course, Deneen is a little late to the game here. I wrote about this divide fifteen years ago in the pages of the New Republic. Still, better late than never. 

Judgment or Mercy in Montana

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Cotton Mather is alive and well and, apparently, serving as the Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Helena, Montana. Patrick Haggarty is the name of the superintendent and he made and defended the decision to fire a Catholic school teacher who got pregnant out of wedlock. You expected the article to end with Haggarty announcing the woman would, henceforth, be made to wear a scarlet “A” upon her outer garments.

Ethics & Criminal Law

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If you are as tired as I am of seeing lawyers argue on CNN, even though you know the issues being discussed are important, an upcoming lecture promises more than cable news soundbites. Professor Samuel Levine, who directs the Jewish Law Institute at Touro Law Center on Long Island, will be delivering a lecture entitled, "An Introduction to the Ethics of Criminal Law: Prosecutors and Defense Attorneys" at Loyola University Maryland, Knott Hall B01, in Baltimore, Maryland, February 17 at 5 p.m.

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In This Issue

August 28-September 10, 2015

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