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Gerson's Bad Analogy

I like Michael Gerson. Lord knows, he is one of the most thoughtful commentators from the right and, as a non-Catholic, has a deep appreciation for the value of Catholic Social Thought.
But, in an op-ed this morning about Grover Norquist's tax orthodoxies, Gerson begins with a reference to the theological battle with the Arians at the Council of Nicaea. It is unclear whether he thinks Norquist stands in the place of Arius or in the place of Athansius, but what is abundantly clear is that both Arius and Athanasius had reputable stances, although the former's position was heretical. Norquist may be an economic heretic. Who cares? The problem is that he is an economic idiot. Actually, that is one of the problems. The other is that Norquist is a political genuis and he has forced the GOP to adopt his insane position on taxes as if it really was as important as the debate at Nicaea over the divinity of Christ. It isn't.

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